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Lupino Lane

‘The Half Pint Hero’ Rubber-limbed British comedian who originated ‘The Lambeth Walk’. 1892  – 1959 For fans of: Buster Keaton Charlie Chaplin Harry Langdon Lupino Lan…

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The 2nd Kennington Bioscope Silent Comedy Weekend: the laughter returns

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Silent London

It’s back, the perfect post-Pordenone pick-me-up: a weekend of giggles at the Cinema Museum curated by the inimitable David Wyatt. I heard great things about last year’s event, but this time you’ll have double the fun with a two-day festival. So ink 22 & 23 October 2016 into your diary and look out for tickets on sale in early September. Here’s what the Kennington Bioscope crew are promising for their second Silent Comedy Weekend:

Two days of (mostly) silent comedy – except for the audience laughter (judging from last year’s successful extravaganza) and live music from our world famous accompanists. 

Feature films with Eddie Cantor and Clara Bow, Harold Lloyd, Max Linder, Monty Banks, Syd Chaplin, Harry Langdon and more. Rare showings of Lupino Lane’s LAMBETH WALK and Walter Forde’s first feature WAIT AND SEE – long–neglected British stars in need of re evaluation – plus some equally forgotten funny females, European shorts from the early years and Laurel &…

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A Couple of Down and Outs (1923) Research, Interpretation and the Case of Walter Summers.

Research can be such an adventure at times. Being a film archaeologist, excavating the influence and importance of films that sometimes cannot be found means assessing the worth of a range of opini…

Source: A Couple of Down and Outs (1923) Research, Interpretation and the Case of Walter Summers.

The Passion of Joan of Arc at Shakespeare’s Globe: a film out of time

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This will be the third time I’ve watched this score and the venue couldn’t be better. But most of all… what a film and what an actress!

Silent London

If you are reading this post and you have never seen The Passion of Joan of Arc, stop now. Skip to the end, click on the link to buy tickets and make your life better with just a few taps of the mouse. Then you can come back and read the rest of what I have to say. Passion is not just one of the very best films of all time, but one that has inspired some of the most exciting scores too – despite the director’s misgivings about it being accompanied by music at all. There have been many film adaptations of the story of Joan of Arc, but Falconetti’s haunting portrayal of the saint, in front of Dreyer’s unflinching camera, is unforgettably raw and moving.

In September, you can see Passion at one of London’s most fascinating venues, Shakespeare’s Globe, as part of a season of live music events…

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Five films I saw at the 1st Kennington Bioscope Silent Film Weekend

Pamela Hutchinson’s Bioscope weekender report from 2015!

Silent London

Silent film marathon #kenningtonbioscope

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At this time of year, a silent film fan starts packing sun cream and sandals and contemplating a journey south to enjoy some warm weather and classic cinema in the company of like-minded souls. But there will be plenty of time to talk about Bologna later. This weekend just gone, I set forth in a southerly direction on the Bakerloo line, snaking under the Thames to the Cinema Museum in Kennington, south London. What I found there was very special indeed – and long may it continue. Everyone who was there with me will relish the idea of the Kennington Bioscope Silent Film Weekend becoming a regular thing, and for the lucky among us, an amuse-gueule for Il Cinema Ritrovato in Bologna.

We love the Kennington Bioscope, that’s already on the record, so the Silent Film Weekend…

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The British Silent Film Symposium 2016

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Felix-laff

Every year in the middle of Spring, a roomful of silent film geeks (this is a compliment btw) gather at King’s College London for a happy wallow in the world of British silent film. Friendships have been forged through Facebook, Twitter, blogs and, of course, real human interaction and these come together in a lovely group of people who share and talk about their latest silent film findings. In spite of the squirm-inducing lecture room seats, it’s always a brilliant day. This year’s programme covered a terrific range of subjects and angles; happily it’s not intimidating for those of us outside academia. Here’s my round-up of a day that featured moral panics, hidden histories and the sights, sounds and smells of cinema.

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Book now for the British Silent Film Festival Symposium

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Silent London

You heard it here first …  but now the details of April’s British Silent Film Festival Symposium have been released. You can peruse the lineup of speakers and films (I’m picking favourites already, natch) and even more excitingly you can book your ticket now. The two days of papers and films comes in at a very reasonable £20 and I am confident that I can confirm a resounding YES to the “Will there be tea and biscuits?” question.

The Somme (1927) (Image: BFI) The Somme (1927) (Image: BFI)

Check out the lineup here:

Thursday 28 April 2016
Arthur and Paula Lucas Lecture Theatre

2pm – LAWRENCE NAPPER Welcome (no registration needed on this day)

2.10 – TONY FLETCHER ‘Sound Before Blackmail’ – a programme of early sound-on-disc films matched with their discs (30mins)

2.40 – SCREENING KNOCKAGOW (Fred O’Donovan, 1918) (80mins)

4pm BREAK (30 mins)

4.30 – DAVID ROBINSON ‘Leopoldo Fregoli, Superstar and Progenitor of…

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